Stafford youngsters find out more about trees

Tuesday 14th February 2017

Staffordshire Wildlife Trust is helping to give children a chance to learn more about native trees as part of a Government-backed scheme to boost the environment.

The Trust visited Burton Manor Primary School last week as part of the Woodland Trust’s ‘Trees for Schools’ project which is funded by Defra. ‘Trees for Schools’ was designed to help children learn about native UK trees and connect with the natural environment.

The Trust is working alongside The Woodland Trust to deliver the project to schools in Staffordshire. The project has been running across the country for over 10-years with the aim of the new programme being to plant 400,000 trees in schools across England by 2020.

At Burton Manor Primary, the Trust helped to deliver fun and engaging tree themed activities and helped find the perfect spot to plant the trees with pupils.

The school has ordered the free tree packs through The Woodland Trust, and Staffordshire Wildlife Trust will return in March to help plant them with the children.

Duncan Coleman, Education Services Officer for Staffordshire Wildlife Trust, said: “A lot of children never have the chance to plant a tree, but this project allows them to do that. It is vital that children feel part of our natural history and are connected to nature from an early age and ‘Trees for Schools’ gives them the chance to do just that.

“It gives them a special memory and has already benefitted thousands of children across the country by giving them a chance to identify iconic native trees and understand the benefits of a healthy environment for our prosperity and wellbeing.”

Sarah McDonald, Burton Manor Primary teacher, said: “The day was educational, engaging and inspiring. The children and staff across the school thoroughly enjoyed taking part and are enthusiastic about the forthcoming planting of the trees.”

Any schools interested in the ‘Trees for Schools’ project should email Duncan Coleman at the Trust – d.coleman@staffs-wildlife.org.uk or by calling 01889 880100.